Summer of resistance

Gotta rock it don't stop

 

 

 
 
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Track 1:  FDT - YG

It wouldn’t be the USA without Mexicans
And if it’s time to team up, shit, let’s begin

When asked by Billboard if it’s important for artists in hip-hop to share their political views, YG said the following: 

We got a lot of people with power that really ain’t doing too much. I feel like these motherfuckers that got more power have to open their eyes and register to vote but motherfuckers really ain’t doing nothing...But fuck all that – this hip hop, this rap, we got a platform and we’re going to use it for the right shit. I ain’t hesitating no more.

Shortly after the song was released, YG claimed the Secret Service was investigating his lyrics, and that they threatened to pull Still Brazy off the shelves if he didn’t censor his lyrics:

 

Track 2: Pussy Riot - Make America Great Again

What do you want your world to look like?
What do you want it to be?
Do you know that a wall has two sides?
And nobody is free?

 

 

Track 3: Prince - Controversy

(I said) life is just a game, were all just the same...(don’t ya wanna play?)
Controversy controversy controversy controversy

The Moral Majority was on the rise in 1981, emboldened by the inauguration of Ronald Reagan. By November, a funky reaction appeared in the form of "Controversy." Prince's 13th single counterbalanced the conservative backlash against anything – music, movies, TV, books, sex –  "Am I black or white? Am I straight or gay?"; "Do I believe in God? Do I believe in me?" – while potentially baiting the Jerry Falwells of the world by reciting the Lord's Prayer. It's the sound of Prince hijacking American morality and making it his plaything.

 

 

Sabotage - Beastie Boys

“I can’t stand it, I know you planned it
I’m-a set it straight, this Watergate”

"Sabotage" is a 1994 song by American hip-hop group Beastie Boys, released as the first single from their fourth studio album Ill Communication.

 

 

Better Change Your Mind - William Onyeabor

America, You ever think this world is yours eh? heh?
And you Russia, You ever think this world is yours?

William Onyeabor was born in Nigeria to a poor family. Over the course of his life, he would run a semolina flour mill, study cinematography in Russia, and self-release eight albums. An annual music festival called Atomic Bomb honors his life and work.

 

Long walk to D.C. - The Staple Singers

I gotta see the president no matter what it takes
I'll tell yah, It's a long walk to DC, yeah
But I'm lonely, oh yes I am ooh, yeah, but I know I'll make it some day

The Staple Singers have been performing their blend of gospel, folk and Delta blues music since 1935. From the streets of Harlem to the arenas of Africa to the corridors of the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame, their call of peace and compassion has remained steadfast through America's most turbulent times.

 

 

Rising Down - The Roots

Ingredients influential on your ways and acts
Zero tolerance to raise the tax
It don't matter how your gates is latched
You ain't safe from the Danger Jack

... (Hello hello hello hello) ...

The Roots is an American hip hop group, formed in 1987 by Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter and Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson in PhiladelphiaPennsylvania, United States. The Roots' eighth studio album, Rising Down, was released on April 29, 2008, the 16-year anniversary of the Los Angeles riots of 1992.

 

 

Come as You Are - Nirvana

And I swear that I don't have a gun
No, I don't have a gun
No, I don't have a gun

Yup.

 

 

Be Above it - Tame Impala

"I know that I gotta be above it now
And I cannot let them all just bring me down

 

 

I’ve lost control - Sleezy D (Virgo)

“Too far gone - ain’t going back.”

Seminal acid house from 1986. We're all losing it. Might as well dance. 

 

Come Together - Black Thought  (Roots)

One thing I can tell you is you got to be free.

 

Immigrant Song - Led Zepplin

For peace and trust can win the day
 

 

Bring On The Lucie (Freda People) - John Lennon

“Well, we were caught with our hands in the air
Don’t despair paranoia is everywhere
We can shake it with love when we’re scared
So let’s shout it aloud like a prayer”

"Bring on the Lucie (Freda Peeple)" is a protest song written and performed by John Lennon from his 1973 album Mind Games.[1] 

 

 

Don't Lie to Me - Big Star

"I know where you been
And I know what you been doing
Don't lie to me"

 

What is Truth - Johnny Cash

And the lonely voice of youth cries"What is truth?"

"What Is Truth" is a single by American country music artist Johnny Cash released in February 1970. Generally viewed as a protest song, a rarity in country music at the time, the simple criticism of the Vietnam War, and war in general, as well as the stereotypical view of many politically liberal hippies made the song a major crossover hit. 

 

 

 

Don't Believe the Hype - Public Enemy

 

“Don’t believe the hype, it’s a sequel.”
 

The High Road - Broken Bells

Cause they know and so do I
The high road is hard to find

A detour in your new life
Tell all of your friends goodbye

 

Death of a Party- Blur

 

 

Planet Rock - Afrika Bambaata, Soul Sonic Force

Party people
Party people
Can y'all get funky?
Soul Sonic Force, can y'all get funky?
The Zulu Nation, can y'all get funky?
Yeah, just hit me
Just taste the funk and hit me
Just get on down and hit me
Bambaataa's jus' gettin' so funky, now, hit me
Yeah, just hit me

It's time to chase your dreams
Up out your seats, make your body sway
Socialize, get down, let your soul lead the way
Shake it now, go ladies, it's a livin' dream
Love, life, live
Come play the game, our world is free
Do what you want but scream

We know a place where the nights are hot
It is a house of funk, females and males
Both headed all for the disco
The D.J. plays your favorite blasts
Takes you back to the past, music's magic, poof
Bump, bump, bump, get bump with some flash, people

(Rock, rock to the Planet Rock, don't stop)
(Rock, rock to the Planet Rock, don't stop)

The Soul Sonic Force, Mr. Biggs, Pow Wow, and M.C. Globe
We emphasize the show, we got ego
Make this your night, just slip it right, and by day
As the people say, live it up, shucks
No work or play, our world is free
Be what you be, be

(Rock, rock to the Planet Rock, don't stop)
(Rock, rock to the Planet Rock, don't stop)

You're in a place where the nights are hot
Where nature's children dance and set a chance
On this mother Earth, which is our rock
The time has come, and work for soul, show you really got soul
Are you ready hump bump bump, get bump, now let's go, house
Twist and turn, the you let your body slide
You got the body rock and pop, bounce and pounce
Everybody just rock it, don't stop it
Gotta rock it, don't stop
Keep tickin' and tockin', work it all around the clock
Everybody keep rockin' and clockin' and shockin' and rockin', go house
Everybody say, rock it, don't stop it (rock it, don't stop it)
Well hit me, Mr. Biggs (Mr. Biggs)
Pow-wow (pow-wow)
G-L-O-B-E (G-L-O-B-E)
The soul sonic force

Gotta rock this and pop it, 'cause it's the century
There is such a place that creates such a melody
Our world is but a land of a master jam, get up and dance
It's time to chase your dreams
Up out your seats, make your body sway
Socialize, get down, let your soul lead the way
Shake it now, go ladies, it's a livin' dream
Love, life, live

Everybody say, rock it, don't stop it (rock it, don't stop it)
Everybody say, shockin' and clockin' (shockin' and clockin')
Everybody say, ich, mi, sun, chi (ich, mi, sun, chi)
Say, Planet Rock (Planet Rock)
It's the sure shot (it's the sure shot)
Say, Planet Rock (Planet Rock)
It's the sure shot (it's the sure shot)

So twist and turn, then you let your - slide and glide
You got the body rock and pop, bounce and pounce
So hit me
Just taste the funk and hit me
Just get on down and hit me
Bambaataa's gettin' so funky, now hit me
Every piece of the world
Rate the message of our world
All men, women, boys, and girls
Hey, our Planet Rock is superb, get on it
You got the groove, move, da-doo-doo-doo-doo-da
Feel the groove
Feel it, do what ya want but ya know ya got to be cool and boogie
Out on the floor, go down
Bring it low
Close to the ground
Everybody just rock it, don't stop it, gotta rock it don't stop
Keep tickin' and tockin'
Work it all around the clock
Everybody just rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop
Keep tickin' and tockin'
Work it all around the clock
Everybody just rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop it
We gotta rock it, don't stop

 

The Mountain's High - Dick & Dee Dee 

 

 

We The People - A Tribe Called Called Quest

All you Black folks, you must go
All you Mexicans, you must go
And all you poor folks, you must go
Muslims and gays, boy, we hate your ways
So all you bad folks, you must go"

"We the People...." is a song by American hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest, and the first single from their sixth album, We Got It from Here... Thank You 4 Your Service.[1] Produced by Q-Tip and co-produced by Blair Wells, the song contains a sample of the drum break of "Behind the Wall of Sleep" by Black Sabbath.[3] The chorus of the politically-charged song parodies Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

 

 

Fight The Power - Public Enemy ( Do The Right Thing Cut)

 

What we got to say
Power to the people no delay
To make everybody see
In order to fight the powers that be

 

"Fight the Power" is a song by American hip hop group Public Enemy, released as a single in June 1989 on Motown Records. It was conceived at the request of film director Spike Lee, who sought a musical theme for his 1989 film Do the Right Thing. First issued on the film's 1989 soundtrack, a different version was featured on Public Enemy's 1990 studio album Fear of a Black Planet.

"Fight the Power" incorporates various samples and allusions to African-American culture, including civil rights exhortations, black church services, and the music of James Brown.

 

Standing in the way of control - the Gossip

I wanna Destroy You - Soft Boys

Can you Get to That - Funkadelic